Filtered by category: Industry Clear Filter

Starting a Lab Facility: A Primer for Real Estate Professionals

Originally published by Daniel Castner, Brian Spence and Trevor Boz for NAIOP's Summer 2021 Issue.

This fast-growing sector can be complex to navigate for developers.

The scientific research market has grown substantially over the past 10 years. With a global pandemic top of mind, investors are looking at the life science industry now more than ever.

This expanding market is evolving into one of the fastest-growing real estate investment sectors, yet some developers, investors and real estate professionals may be intimidated or confused by the complexities in site selection, design and construction of lab facilities. Familiarity with industry-related terms and a basic understanding of what is needed to develop a successful lab research facility are key starting points. 

Scientific research requires an appropriate environment to conduct experiments, process data, foster collaboration and inspire creativity. Proximity to potential clients and talent, availability of public transportation, tax incentives, zoning restrictions and surrounding neighborhoods are intrinsic traits that must be considered when finding a suitable location to build a project. The configuration of the space can be adaptable to accommodate unknown needs of a program or a future tenant, or it can be targeted toward a specific type of science. 

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Investment in Senior Housing Poised for Strong Growth Following COVID-19

Originally published on June 29, 2021, by Zach Bowyer, Brian Chandler and Bryan Lockard for NAIOP E-Newsletter.

The COVID-19 pandemic interrupted a nearly 12-year growth cycle for the senior housing market, causing a drop in valuations to an eight-year low. Stabilized occupancy rates also fell to record lows due to infections, mandated holds on new resident admissions, safety concerns, and isolation fears. Rents, however, continued to rise, despite significant occupancy losses.

In addition, following four consecutive years of year-over-year decline, total price per bed for nursing homes increased by nearly 22 percent in the first quarter of 2021, marking the second-highest price point for nursing homes ever recorded, according to JLL Valuation Advisory’s recently released Seniors Housing & Care – Investor Survey and Trends Outlook

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Investment in Senior Housing Poised for Strong Growth Following COVID-19

Originally published on June 29, 2021, by Zach Bowyer, Brian Chandler and Bryan Lockard for NAIOP E-Newsletter.

The COVID-19 pandemic interrupted a nearly 12-year growth cycle for the senior housing market, causing a drop in valuations to an eight-year low. Stabilized occupancy rates also fell to record lows due to infections, mandated holds on new resident admissions, safety concerns, and isolation fears. Rents, however, continued to rise, despite significant occupancy losses.

In addition, following four consecutive years of year-over-year decline, total price per bed for nursing homes increased by nearly 22 percent in the first quarter of 2021, marking the second-highest price point for nursing homes ever recorded, according to JLL Valuation Advisory’s recently released Seniors Housing & Care – Investor Survey and Trends Outlook

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Market Activity Focus on High-Value Assets Sustains Growth of U.S. Office Lease Rate

Originally published on July 2, 2021, by Ioana Ginsac for NAIOP E-Newsletter.

Last week, commercial real estate property data and listings platform CommercialEdge published its most recent national office report, which paints a more current picture of office sector activity across the top 50 U.S. markets. Data analyzed for the June 2021 report found that:

  • The average office lease rate was up 0.4% year over year, as asking office rents averaged $38.36 per square foot in May.
  • Vacancy rates reached an average of 15.6%, following a 240 basis points increase compared to May 2020.
  • Office sales closed during the first five months of the year totaled nearly $23 billion, contouring the possibility that 2021 investment activity is likely to at least match last year’s total volume of $61 billion.
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NAIOP June Coronavirus Impacts Survey: Operating Conditions Improve but Developers Grapple with Supply Shortages

Originally published on July 9, 2021 by Shawn Moura Ph.D. for NAIOP E-Newsletter.

In June, NAIOP conducted its eighth survey of its U.S. members on the impacts of COVID-19. Since April 2020, the association has examined the pandemic’s effects on commercial real estate and how firms have responded. Most American adults are vaccinated, and daily coronavirus case counts have plummeted in the five months since the previous survey. This has allowed a widespread return of customers to restaurants and retailers, and most observers now expect that office occupancy rates will rebound in the fall when schools re-open for in-person instruction. 

Respondents to the survey report a strong recovery in retail property rent collections, as well as retail property acquisitions and development activity, alongside continued favorable trends for industrial, office and multifamily properties. Less than one-quarter of respondents now expect the pandemic to significantly affect their business operations for more than a year, and respondents are much more optimistic about employment within their own firms than in previous surveys. 

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Eight Crucial Post-Pandemic Takeaways for the Industry

Originally published by Ron Derven for NAIOP's Development Magazine Summer 2021 Issue.

The post-pandemic period could see a lot of innovation and experimentation in commercial real estate.

COVID-19 delivered a gut punch like no other to the commercial real estate industry last year, with transactions in the second quarter of 2020 plummeting approximately 40% over the same period in 2019.

By the fourth quarter of 2020, however, sales activity had nearly recovered, according to John Chang, director of research with Marcus & Millichap.

“Investors adapted to the new climate and devised new solutions to address the many obstacles to getting business done,” Chang said. “Barring a new, severe and deadly outbreak, COVID-related challenges ahead will likely be speed bumps for the commercial real estate industry rather than roadblocks.”

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5 Solutions for Building Office Interiors Through Supply Shortages, Price Volatility

Originally published on June 22, 2021 by Andy Halik for NAIOP E-Newsletter.

With U.S. coronavirus cases plunging and knowledge workers craving the social component of the workplace, many companies across the country are fully reopening their offices to employees. Some companies took the opportunity to renovate or update their workspace during the lockdown periods of the pandemic, and others are planning significant design changes to prepare for the next era of the office.

Meanwhile, the challenges of renovating or building out office interiors – or constructing ground-up office buildings – are only compounding as the desire to move forward on office projects butts up against unpredictable economic factors. Facing volatile materials prices, a tightening labor market, soaring demand and supply chain inefficiencies, real estate developers, owners, tenants and their builders must take action to mitigate the financial impacts and keep projects on track.

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When Office Real Estate Investors Can Expect a Turnaround

Originally published on June 21, 2021 by Marc Rapport for MillionAcres.com.

The pandemic recovery in the office sector is underway and is projected to reach positive net absorption in the fourth quarter of this year, according to research from NAIOP, the Commercial Real Estate Development Association.

 

That turning point will be followed by a return to more normal levels, predicts the report titled “Office Space Demand Forecast, Second Quarter 2021,” researched and written by professors Hany Guirguis of Manhattan College and Michael Seiler of William & Mary and the University of Cambridge.

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Next Steps with the 2040 Plan

The following statement was issued by REBIC on Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Last night the “Plan Policy” section of the 2040 Comprehensive Plan passed the Charlotte City Council by a 6-5 vote. This outcome had been widely expected for several weeks. In the end, REBIC took the position that moving ahead to the more difficult challenges, such as the debate over the “Implementation Strategy” and “Manuals and Metrics” sections, as well as the Place Type mapping and ultimately the Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) was in the best interests of all parties. It was evident that members of City Council had withdrawn to their respective corners and that any further compromise was not possible.

Following an introduction, the real estate industry faced some big hurdles:

  • Removal of Mandatory impact fees
  • Removal of Mandatory inclusionary zoning
  • Removal of Mandatory Community Benefit Agreements
  • A broken process set up to accept comments but one that provided little feedback in return
  • A City Council (with the exception of a few members) with little knowledge of the Plan
  • A tight, artificial timeline with a proposed vote on the entire document by April 26th

After last night here’s where we are:

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Covid-19 Rent Breaks for Retailers Are Becoming the New Norm

Originally published on June 15, 2021, by Esther Fung for the Wall Street Journal.

During the worst of the pandemic, many landlords offered deals where ailing retailers paid a percentage of their monthly sales in rent—rather than a fixed amount—to help them survive. Now, this once temporary way of charging tenants looks poised to outlast Covid-19.

More shopping-center owners are signing new leases where rent is tied directly to a portion of sales, at least for a period. These percentage-rent leases are especially attractive to newer retailers, offering some flexibility so that they aren’t saddled with large losses as they are starting out.

While most landlords tend to prefer the reliability of a fixed monthly rent payment, the wider use of percentage leases reflects how much retail has become a renters’ market.

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Mixed-Use at the Core of Mall Reinvention

Originally published on June 15, 2021, by Katie Sloan for Rebusiness Online.

When it comes to mall redevelopment, one of the biggest hurdles is changing the business community’s perception that enclosed malls are only for retail use, says Sean Garrett, president of acquisitions and director of community relations for East Peoria, Illinois-based Cullinan Properties Ltd. 

“There is no reason an insurance office can’t be right next to a retailer and a neighbor of a dentist,” states Garrett. “Downtowns and Main Streets have been developed this way for generations.” 

Cullinan recently followed this approach when it rebranded its Quincy Mall in Quincy, Illinois, to Quincy Town Center. One of the anchor tenants is now Quincy Medical Group, which backfilled a former Bergner’s department store. For Garrett, merging retail and medical uses today is a “natural fit.”

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Lessons in Mitigating Risk on a Megaproject

Originally published in NAIOP's Development Magazine Spring 2021 Issue by Ann Moore.

Waterfront development in California used multiple strategies to get off the ground.

Megaprojects can transform landscapes, improve quality of life and deliver significant economic benefits to their communities. When they are sited on a waterfront in a binational urban area, they take on even more complexity. In Southern California’s San Diego County, a megaproject will transform a formerly blighted stretch of waterfront into a thriving destination. The project team is pursuing innovative ways to reduce the risk that could be instructive to other development teams. 

A megaproject is defined by its scale and complexity. Typically costing $1 billion or more, such projects take many years to develop and build, involve multiple public and private stakeholders and impact millions of people, according to the Oxford Handbook of Megaproject Management. A considerable upside also brings great risk, which must be managed to improve the chances of success. 

On approximately 535 acres, the Chula Vista Bayfront is larger than Disneyland and one of the last significant large-scale waterfront development opportunities in Southern California. Once defined by a power plant and an aerospace factory, this brownfield waterfront is ripe for redevelopment in the U.S.-Mexico border region of 6.5 million people. The location is about a 15-minute drive from the busiest land border crossing in the western hemisphere. More than 100,000 people cross the San Diego-Tijuana, Mexico, border every day. Thus, the project site can target a market that includes U.S. citizens, Mexican nationals, and travelers using airports in San Diego and Tijuana. 

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Investors Pour $10b Into Life Sciences Real Estate This Year

Originally published on June 2, 2021, by Sasha Jones for Bloomberg News.

The future of the office sector remains largely uncertain at this point post-pandemic, but there’s one segment that continues to see huge gains.

Investors have spent more than $10 billion on buying life sciences buildings this year, Bloomberg News reported, citing data from Real Capital Analytics. That’s about 4 percent of all global commercial real estate transactions through May, twice what was recorded at the same time last year.

And those numbers don’t even include new life-science developments, such as Boston’s massive Fenway Center, which broke ground in 2017.

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Office Space Absorption Projected to Stabilize by Mid-2022

The NAIOP Research Foundation has published the NAIOP Office Space Demand Forecast for Q2 2021.

Key Takeaways:

  • Increasing COVID-19 vaccination rates and strong economic growth will help demand for office space rebound, with a return to a positive net absorption forecast for the fourth quarter of 2021.
     
  • Quarterly net absorption in 2022 is forecast to average 11.7 million square feet, in line with the 2015-2019 quarterly average of 11.6 million square feet.
     
  • Although tenants have begun to return to the office, it remains to be seen how widely they will adopt long-term remote work arrangements. Remote work will likely limit net absorption for the next several quarters.
     
  • Tenants may now prefer less dense office layouts than before the pandemic, partially offsetting declines in demand due to remote work.
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Investors Bet on Commercial Real Estate, Undeterred by Empty Offices and Hotel Rooms

Originally published on May 18, 2021, by Knorad Putzier for The Wall Street Journal.

More than a year into the pandemic, high-rise office buildings are largely empty. About one of every two hotel rooms is unoccupied. Malls are struggling to attract shoppers.

And yet by most measures, the U.S. commercial real-estate market is in remarkably solid shape. Prices fell far less than after the 2008 financial crisis and are already rising again. The number of foreclosures barely increased. Pension funds and private-equity firms are once again spending record sums on buildings.

The market’s resilience shows how the federal government’s aggressive efforts to support the economy kept landlords from suffering steep losses. Banks have also offered delinquent property owners some slack, rather than foreclosing aggressively.

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The Death and Life of the Central Business District

Originally published by Richard Florida for Bloomberg CityLab on May 14, 2021.

Just last spring, a chorus of pundits loudly proclaimed a sweeping urban exodus and the impending death of cities. Now, just slightly more than a year later, our cities are springing back to life. Sidewalks are starting to bustle; restaurants, which have spilled onto the streets, are teeming with patrons; museums and galleries are reopening; and fans are heading back to baseball parks, basketball arenas and even outdoor concert venues.

But one area of urban life where the pandemic is poised to leave a far bigger mark is on the places where we do business. The ongoing shift to remote work challenges the historic role of the Central Business Districts — neighborhoods like New York’s Midtown and Wall Street, Chicago’s Loop, or San Francisco’s Financial District — as the dominant centers for urban work. 

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COVID-19 Creates a Downshift in Parking Demand

Originally published in the Spring 2021 Issue by Jennifer LeFurgy, Ph.D. for Development Magazine.

Large revenue shortfalls will accelerate technological advances, conversions and design innovations. 

Quarantines and business shutdowns fueled by the COVID-19 pandemic have led to a dramatic decrease in parking demand. Subsequently, many sectors of the economy that depend on parking revenue are facing budget shortfalls this year.

Spothero.com reported in 2020 that the parking industry saw parking volumes in many areas fall by up to 97%, resulting in job losses and furloughs for 50% of the industry’s workforce. Commuter lots had a 50% to 70% reduction in use, while visitor lots saw up to a 95% drop from the same time the previous year, according to a survey by Smarking, a parking software company. 

Municipalities are scrambling to recover not only lost parking income but also a dramatic reduction in revenue from fees and fines. A 2019 CarRentals.com survey of parking data for 16 major U.S. cities found that they collected a total of $1.4 billion in annual parking ticket revenue. In 2019, Chicago issued 2.06 million parking tickets. Through June 30 of 2020, the city gave out less than 500,000. New York City projected that it would lose $600 million in parking revenues in 2020.

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Construction employment stalls in April

Originally published on May 7, 2021, for the Building  Design and Construction Network.

Construction employment was unchanged from March to April as nonresidential contractors and home builders alike struggled to obtain materials and find enough workers, according to an analysis by the Associated General Contractors of America of government data released today. Association officials said the industry’s recovery was being hampered by problems getting stable prices and reliable deliveries of key materials, while the pandemic and federal policies were making it harder for firms to find workers to hire.

“Contractors are experiencing unprecedented intensity and range of cost increases, supply-chain disruptions, and worker shortages that have kept firms from increasing their workforces,” said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “These challenges will make it difficult for contractors to rebound as the pandemic appears to wane.”

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That Vacated Sears Store May Reopen as a Public School

Originally published on May 4, 2021, by Esther Fung for The Wall Street  Journal.

Mall owners have hit on a new way to fill gaping holes left by failed department stores and other departing big-box tenants: hosting public schools in need of more space.

Landlords are focused in particular on the nation’s 7,500 charter schools, which are public-funded institutions run independently of school districts. These schools usually have to find and finance their own buildings.

In cramped cities and other places where land is scarce, charter schools and mall owners are finding common ground. Dozens of charter and other public schools have leased space in shopping centers, public records show.

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NEW 2040 Comp Plan Draft Released

The recommended draft of the Charlotte Future 2040 Comprehensive Plan is now available online at cltfuture2040.com. The City of Charlotte is hosting a virtual Planning Community Conversation about the recommended draft on Thursday, May 27, from 5:30-6:30 p.m.

Anyone interested in participating must complete the community conversation sign-up form to speak during the meeting and submit questions or comments through the WebEx virtual meeting platform. The meeting will also be live on the City of Charlotte’s YouTube and Facebook pages, and staff will take questions submitted through the video comments.

The City will be hosting a press conference at 3:30 today to discuss the new draft.

Our analysis will be released in the coming days, once we have had adequate time to review the changes.

Read the New Draft Here